Skip to main content

Teens

Page from Newsweek magazine, from September 2001

This is part II in the series commemorating the 20th anniversary of the 9/11/2001 attacks. This post continues with more library staff memories of that day. 

Photo of 9/11 Memorial in NYC

To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and to remember all those lost due to that day's tragic events, this post takes a look back at that day through the eyes of several Library staff members, and a few other unique perspectives. 

Can you believe it?! The downtown library has called Church Street home for 20 years now! Let's take a look back at the history of the downtown library, and how it came to call 615 Church Street home. 

From Metro Archives Photos - Metro Council member, Thelma Harper

The world lost an extraordinary woman on April 22nd, 2021, when former State Senator Thelma Harper passed away. After making history by becoming the first African American female elected to the State Senate, her work of shattering ceilings was far from over. Here's a look back at her impressive career and generous life. 

From City Beautiful Scrapbook in 1956 - Ford Green Elementary students with anti-litter signs

Keeping the streets, rivers, and neighborhoods clean in this city over the years hasn't been easy, but one of the ways was with the City Beautiful Commission, that was established in 1953. In honor of Earth Day, here's a look at the commission that helped clean up the streets and neighborhoods in Nashville. 

Wonder Woman: Dead Earth

Wonder Woman’s place in DC’s trinity--along with Batman and Superman--has never been in doubt, but finding a story which suis not only her messy backstory but also the near-omnipotence of her powers has proved difficult for many creators.

The CDC reported that 1 in 54 children were diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder in 2016.  The diagnosis can seem daunting but knowledge is power.  Nashville Public Library has the resources to provide knowledge and understanding for parents, friends, siblings and others.

View of Market Street

2020 went out with an unfortunate bang in Nashville, when on Christmas morning, a Nashville resident blew up his RV on 2nd Ave N. As a dedication to the individuals and businesses impacted, here's a look back at the history of 2nd Ave. This is 2-part series, part I covering 19th century Market Street and part II covering 20th Century 2nd Ave.  

Tennessean photo from 2003 when the bears were being cleaned

Most citizens of this city that have lived here for a few years know what I'm referring to when I say the "Edgehill Polar Bears", but do you know the history of them? Well here are the "bear" necessities.

New Era clipping from April 7th, 1870 in celebration of the ratification of the 15th Amendment

The phrase "voting rights" encompasses a LOT of history, even when narrowed to the history of voting rights in Tennessee. While I wish I could write a blog post that includes all the important gains and struggles of voting rights in this state, instead, I'm narrowing it to a few highlights, starting with noting the 150th anniversary of the 15th Amendment. 

James Estes' voter registration card, 1945

Since most of this year has seemed like an episode out of a sci-fi novel, and it's not lost on anyone that we're living through a major historical event, here are some suggestions of important things you might consider keeping for posterity's sake. 

Sign advertising the construction of the Municipal Auditorium

While September is normally my month for educational posts, I'm bypassing that this year for something different - new images and footage! As a continuation from a previous post with old photos, this post includes a slideshow of a collection I've been processing the past few weeks, plus some new footage from our Audiovisual Heritage Center. 

Ad from the Nashville Globe newspaper for Dr. Josie E. Wells

Since we're closed, here's a virtual tour of Metro Archives' current exhibit of "Nashville Voices - 36 Notable Women of Nashville", as it's finished right now. And discussing one of the recently added women in the display - Dr. Josie E. Wells...maybe a couple more individuals as I continue working

This month's Nashville history post is letting photography do the talking, with a variety of slideshows for all to enjoy. Starting with a tribute to all medical workers for their dedicated service during these trying times, to finishing with a little more of "Some Good News - Archives Edition." 

With the extra time on our hands after a month of quarantine, maybe there are other things we can spend our time on, like preserving family ephemera. This is an assisted blog post from my coworker, Christine Irizarry, who writes about the importance of family letters. And the latter part talks about preserving your family records. 

How does a vacation to a far-off destination sound to you? Maybe with a beautiful, sandy beach or a picturesque french countryside; amazing right? And also not physically feasible for most people right now. But that doesn't mean you can't still go to these places, just check out one of these books. 

With Earth Day just around the corner, let's take a look at some ideas for easy, around-the-house activities you can do to help out the planet.

With the changing times and means to educate while schools are closed, it can be difficult for parents-now-turned-teachers to homeschool on such short notice, and possibly without a lot of resources. That's where Metro Archives and the Library come in handy. And who says educating can't be fun? So here's a word search I created with words and names pertaining to the founding of the city of Nashville. 

We're turning off holds while we're closed. How do you keep track of books you want to read and movies you want to watch if you can’t put them on hold? Use the My Lists feature in our web catalog!

This is a great collection for the ghost story neophyte or for the old hand at enjoying ghost stories.  The editors present a collection that includes both classic and new tales from established authors in the genre. In bringing these masterful tales back from the dead, Ghost Stories will enlighten and frighten both longtime fans and new readers of the genre.

Soooo this year has started off rather interestingly...and by interesting I mean NOT GREAT, so far. So instead of writing a whole bunch of historic info, I'm just giving you all photos this month. These are some of my favorites from our collection that I hope may bring a smile to some of your faces. 

Periods of self-distancing and isolation can make us feel anxious and BORED. Here are some recommendations for ebooks that help you fill the time with activity or stillness.

I’m really a ghost story kind of guy, but the title of this book intrigued me:  Mystery Writers of America Presents VENGEANCE, edited by Lee Child.  I remembered really fun stories about vengeance from my high school teaching days—“The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe sticking out most in my mind.

In honor of African American History Month, and to highlight a few individuals in Metro Archives' new display on Nashville women, this blog post is dedicated to a few notable women of Music City.

You know when you pick it up that a book whose writer has won the Nobel Prize in Literature is going to be an important read.  I picked up The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing because it piqued my curiosity. 

This time of year may mostly be associated with the various holidays we celebrate, but it's also well-associated with cold, awful weather (except for these past few weeks) and keeping ourselves warm with our HVAC systems. However, there was a time in Nashville's past that staying warm also meant being covered in soot as well. 

Well folks here we are at the end of another year. I've laughed, I've cried, and I've definitely hit my reading goal. Let me tell you all about my 2019 stand outs.

September of this year has come and gone, and so has 50 years since the release of the The Beatleslast and arguably most iconic album, Abbey Road. Read a little about the history of the album and about The Beatles in Nashville (separately unfortunately, never together). 

Right now, in the basement of the library, in the puppet workshop, a story is being brought to life. It is the story of Lorraine: the Girl Who Sang the Storm Away. Let’s take a behind-the-scenes look at this brand new show by Wishing Chair Productions in collaboration with Old Crow Medicine Show front man Ketch Secor.

Ronald Wimberly has gathered and presents quotes from a dozen black luminaries in mutliple fields. He provides illustrations of each person, some background information, and their most memorable quotes.

Right now, in the Pacific Ocean, is a widening gyre of plastic garbage, and among the junk food wrappers are heaps of forsaken toys, broken, exploded by firecrackers, and forgotten by spoiled children across the world. Intrepid explorers through this archaeological landscape will be able to timestamp their findings to the early to mid-1980s when they stumble upon the impressive figure of He-Man.

“With wicked insight, Joyce Carol Oates demonstrates why the females of the species—be they six-year olds, seemingly devoted wives, or aging mothers—are by nature more deadly than the males” (cover flap).

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. In honor of that momentous occasion, Metro Archives recently had an exhibit highlighting Nashville's impact on space exploration. Here are a few things included in the exhibit! 

Science fiction teaches us not to bother. Don’t investigate that derelict spaceship. Don’t try to figure out what “soylent green” is, because figuring stuff out only causes trouble. Sure, there are wonderful discoveries to be made, but sometimes it’s important for buried secrets to remain hidden, deep in the ground.

One cannot, I think, err when choosing to read one of Joyce Carol Oates’ anthologies of stories.    This volume, Haunted:  Tales of the Grotesque, is as good as any other at introducing the reader to one of the great anthologists and short fiction writers of the last century. Winner of several  O. Henry awards for her short fiction, Oates has also received the Rea Award for Achievement in the Short Story.  Oates clearly knows her way around the shadows and mists on the dark side of the imagination.

As part 1 of a 2-part series about the local photography institution that is Dury's, and also in honor of National Photography Month, read about how one of Nashville's oldest businesses got its start and has remained a successful and beloved business in Nashville all of these years. 

This book is a hugely entertaining work of pop history that traces the use of poison as a political—and cosmetic—tool in royal courts, from western Europe in the Middle Ages to today’s Kremlin. 

Nashville's history with theatre and the performing arts is long and storied. You can find treasure after treasure documenting this history in NPL Special Collections. On May 25, Special Collections is playing its own role in the story.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie offers here nine spooky tales of women  haunted by ghosts-both literal and metaphysical.  There is no clue, or introduction, to tell us why the focus is on women, only the stories, each with a female protagonist, grappling somewhere between the natural and the supernatural, the definite and the not-quite-defined.

It seems that many of the authors of ghost stories—including M.R. James and H.P. Lovecraft—point to the stories of Sheridan Le Fanu as the preeminent masterpieces of the genre.  As a ghost story enthusiast, it took me some time to get to him in my “studies,” but the wait and the reward were both well worth the wait.  In a Glass Darkly contains six stories considered by critics to be among Le Fanu’s best works. 

What a great book of stories for the ghost story enthusiast who wants something different than the Victorian classics!  Editor Ellen Datlow says this collection of stories is designed to be scary—and indeed, even the most self-composed reader may find the hair rising and the skin creeping over this collection.

New to the world of anime and manga? So am I! Here are just a few reasons why you should give them a try.

This spring, as we read the 2019 Nashville Reads book Hidden Figures, and reimagine our country’s history together, there’s no better place than Nashville Public Library to explore the "hidden figures" in our own local history. Dr. Margaret Rhea Seddon is one of these local hidden figures with an incredible story about reaching the stars.

The Nashville Room has a small exhibit of photographs to celebrate the availability of a new collection documenting the activities of the YWCA Blue Triangle Branch. Come see our resources!

Did you know a third of people who make New Year’s resolutions don’t keep them past January? Free library resources can help you beat those odds.

.content-teaser--tag {display: none;} .content-teaser--body {padding: .8rem;} .content-teaser--body .summary {font-size: .75rem;}

The announcement of the Caldecott, Newbery, and other recipients of the American Library Association (ALA) Youth Media Awards is a cause for celebration! Did your favorites win? Or what books will now be on your reading list? Check out our round-up (with links to our collection) below

Welcome to the seventh post in Nashville Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center’s film preservation mini-series. In this series we’re telling the story of our project to conserve and identify hundreds of previously hidden gems in our film collection. These works document the history and culture of the South and range in date from the 1920’s to the 1990’s.

One of our most-utilized resources here in Special Collections is the Nashville Banner clippings: articles about every aspect of Nashville life from the 1950s through the 1990s. In this post, I use Banner clippings to tell you the story of two popular types of night spot entertainment: mechanical bull riding and karaoke!

Welcome to the sixth post in Nashville Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center’s blog mini-series about film preservation. Throughout this series we have taken you through the process of identifying, conserving, and rehousing over 400 rare and unique films from our collection. In this post we will highlight the content of one of our larger film collections. Thanks for joining us!

Exploring the holdings of Main Library’s Special Collections, I stumbled upon a local figure I hadn’t heard of before—Robert Churchwell. Hired by the Nashville Banner in 1950, Churchwell was the first black journalist and full-time reporter for a Southern newspaper.

Welcome to the fifth post in Nashville Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center’s blog mini-series! In this series, you are invited in for a behind-the-scenes look at our year-long project to conserve and catalog the archive’s rare and unique film collection.

The holidays are here! Which means we all have plenty of time to binge watch our favorite TV shows.

This Veteran's Day marks the 100th Anniversary of the signing of the Armistice between the Allied Countries and Germany, ending the hostilities on the Western Front of the War and officially beginning the end of World War I. 

Anyone that's ever walked down Charlotte Ave, right next to the Capitol, is familar with the statues surrounding its borders (or maybe you're not, that's possible too). But if you are, Sam Davis is on the southwest corner and Sgt. Alvin C. York is on the southeast. But are you familiar with who's standing in the middle, somewhat leering over all who walk beneath him? Or better yet, why he's there?

Welcome to Shocktober! (Thunder crashes) Today for your horrific pleasure, I bring you – THE FEMALE BRAIN! (Bwa-ha-ha)

Every October, the Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word, turns our “it city” into “lit city.” With three days of thoughtful, exciting programming, this event has long been a fall-time favorite, appealing to more than just bookworms. I investigated the roots of this community-building festival using primary and secondary sources from NPL Special Collections.

How can manga show us not just great stories, but deep characters as well? Find out inside as we look at some highly recommended dramatic manga series!

It’s here! It’s here! The wait is finally over. Our new equipment has been unboxed and put together!

This is post #4 in our series documenting the Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center’s Film Conservation Project, and boy are we pumped to share the details of our new film inspecting equipment!

Welcome to Post #2 in our series documenting the Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center’s Film Conservation Project. Over the next few months, we are engaged in an exciting project to conserve and identify over 400 rare and unique vintage films in the Metro Archives collection. This work will form the foundation for preservation of and access to our collection.

The Metro Archives’ Audiovisual Conservation Center is located at the Main Library in downtown Nashville. We're hosting a new series on the blog documenting our latest project to identify and perform conservation on over 400 rare and unique films from our collection. Welcome to our corner! We hope you’ll follow along with us!

Take a look into the world of manga genres by diving in and learning about Shojo, one of the most popular types of manga publications, and some shining examples!

2018 is a landmark anniversary year for many events, including the worst train accident in U.S. history that occurred at Dutchman's Curve in West Nashville, on Tuesday, July 9th, 1918. 

If you want a straight-up, studio-jam experience of the legendary Memphis music scene, this DVD will not disappoint you and will leave you wanting more and more and more...

Do you love Giant Robots? Drama? Larger than Life Action? Look no further than these excellent entries into one of the grandest animated series in all of Japan!

Punk rock is the voice of the silenced. It rises in troubling times, disquiets in times of peace.  We take a look at some of  Nashville Public Library's most punk rock books by pioneers who were there for its rise, its fall, and its revival. After all, libraries are punk: what's more punk than free access to information?

WARNING: This post contains spoilers for the film Avengers: Infinity War, because the internet is a cruel place.

It's been 50 years this month since the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., yet his actions and teachings have lived on every day since. Coincidentally, the date of his actual birthday this year was celebrated on the same day of the holiday honoring him. In honor of his legacy, here's a look back at how his work affected Nashville...

To get ready for the upcoming release of Deadpool 2: The Search for More Money*, we're looking back at the movie career of Deadpool himself, Mr. Ryan Reynolds.

I’ve been wrong about a lot of things. The first time I used the internet I typed “X-Men” into a search engine and, finding the results unsatisfactory, said, “This will never catch on.”

Ah, here is something to be savored and enjoyed!  I make no bones about Flamenco’s being my favorite art form, but biases aside, this is a magnificent, gorgeous, jaw-dropping film by a master director, Carlos Saura.

Searching for manga that will invigorate and fill your craving for adventure? Look no further than these two highly recommended series!

An award winning game designer tells what it was like to be at the center of Gamer Gate.

No, his mind is not for rent. To any God or government...

In honor of African American History Month (and also the month of love), I'm honoring a local Nashville citizen and veteran, Raymond Whittaker, from the small collection of his correspondence, ephemera, and photos we have here in Archives. 

Who loves talking about the weather?! Me, that's who! Did you know the early beginnings of the National Weather Service was actually under the U.S. Army in what was called the Signal Service? Actually it's not that surprising, but what might be is that here in Metro Archives, we have several of their original journals from the Nashville station. Read on if you're intrigued...

 

A movie about a musical about one hit wonders with JC Chasez and Topher Grace? Yes please.

Visionary science fiction and fantasy author Ursula K. Le Guin has passed away at the age of 88.

As a new year dawns, so do the opportunities to seek and find new connections! These manga series look into two vastly different ways of how sometimes relationships get complicated!

Registration for the 8th Annual LEGO Competition is open! Calling all brick builderskid, teen, and adult! 

Rashad "thaPoet" Rayford shares his reading list for those who wish to further explore activism and civil rights in literature.

Welcome to Part #2 of my NaNoWriMo series. We are now nine days into NaNoWriMo, and at roughly 2,000 words a day, you should have written about 18,000 words. Are you keeping pace? Need help?

As the days get shorter and Halloween is not too distant in the past, let us preview some manga tales of the supernatural. One of these manga is an all-time classic, the other is still publishing! Join us as we journey into the unknown world of monsters and spirits!

It’s almost that time of year again. We’ll soon know who is going to play in the World Series. Will the Cubs repeat or will it be another 108 years until we once again know the joy of victory?

The birthday train rolls on and the music theme continues. 

Going on 60 years ago, Nashville followed suit with the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, and began a "stair-step" plan to integrate public schools. But it wasn't without difficulty or a strong pushback.

As summer turns to fall and everyone is back in school, we all face new challenges, difficulties, and tests in life. Usually everyone falls back on their friends to help them during these times and their friends are there for them. So what happens when the challenges are a little...alien?! Find out in this Manga Exploration!

If today you were to spot a kid walking around and talking to themselves, you'd probably reasonably conclude that they were imaginative.

As the country collectively experienced the first total eclipse in many, many years on Mondayhere's a look back at previous eclipses that Nashville has experienced.

Prior to the opening of the Nashville Zoo in Cheatham County, in 1991, the city came close to purchasing animals for a zoo around the time the Metro Government formed (1963). I recently stumbled upon this intriguing story and thought it was too good not to share. 

What happens if all your dreams come true when you're still teenager? Usually, you become Justin Bieber. Wil Wheaton avoided the path taken by most child actors, but his journey was still as bumpy as it was beautiful.

Are you feeling the need for the regal in your reading life? Are you looking for manga that leaves a feel-good warmth with some laughs and drama along the way? Do we have some good news: it’s once again time to provide you with a classic and a popular manga to add to your lists!

This post's theme is stronger heroines, conquering their fears and defying limitations that imposed on them by others. One has the Princess due to a family title and the other has the title that they have given themselves. That being said, both of them hold the right to refer to themselves as Princesses at heart.

June 1, 1796 was the birth year for Tennessee as a state. Feels like it was just yesterday. In honor of its many years since, here's a brief recap of its birth and how the state chose to celebrate each of its earned centennials. 

The one thing that I love to tell people about when they visit Metro Archives, is that we're more than simply a repository for city-wide governmental records. Yes, the records we have are archaic in nature and therefore highly informative and fascinating. But it's the photographs we also have from around the city that are most-telling about the city's past. In honor of National Photography month, check out some of the best photos from around our beloved city.

I laughed while driving in traffic. Yeah. It's that funny. (I was listening to the audio version. Don't freak out.)

Are you feeling like taking a manga break in the middle of a busy schedule of work and bustle? Again we take the time to compare an absolute must-read manga with an up-and-coming manga series. In this edition, we compare the classic slice of life manga Azumanga Daioh with the recently published Kiniro Mosaic!

 

Though its expansive campus can be seen from the fast lanes of I-65 S just past Armory Lane, Father Ryan High School hasn't always called their Norwood Drive location home. On top of possessing photographs of the previous location's building and demolition in our clippings' file on the school, Metro Archives also holds several other treasures that easily tell stories about the school's past.  

Animanga month is every March at Nashville Public Library. By now, you may need new ideas about what to read in the manga world. What to read among the hundreds of series that come out in a year? Look no further for something a little older along with something newly released in America!

Thirty years after the release of his most famous work, most people still don’t know the name Koji Kondo. This installment of the 33 ⅓ series goes a long way toward correcting that.

Want to improve your fitness but low on time? High intensity interval training, or HIIT, can help you get just as good of a workout in half the time!

Considering how in our modern day and age, seeing (and hearing) airplanes regularly cross Nashville's skies does not appear to make us think twice, doesn't it make you wonder what life must have been like when the first forms of flight were being tested? I suppose to us, it would literally be like seeing pigs fly. Almost. Well Metro Archives is attempting to answer that question. Starting March 28th and running through May 31st, there will an exhibit in Metro Archives highlighting the advancement of aviation technology as Nashville experienced it.  

She was convicted of murder at age nine. Now she is pregnant and in state custody at age sixteen. If Mary can't trust her mother, her social worker, or her own memory, how will she survive and make a better life for her and her baby?

Reading to and with your child opens up a world of possibilities. In 1997, a small group at NEA (National Education Association) decided that reading should be celebrated, like a pep rally celebrates sports.  

Greetings!  I’m always up for a good scare or haunting, and when this book came sliding through my hands, I set it aside out of a sense of duty because I am the Yankee who has lived here for twenty-five years and still doesn’t know enough about the Bell Witch to sound respectable around a cracker barrel. 

Hard to believe it's been 18 years since the Titans' first game in their new home and in their new jerseys. Throughout many seasons, players, and a couple of coaches, the team has remained a hometown favorite (well, in my opinion - my favorite) and that includes its stadium. 20 years ago this May, construction began on the field that was initially crowned "Adelphia Coliseum." Would you believe Metro Archives has several photographs taken of the construction process? If you enjoy a little Titans nostalgia like I do, check out some of the best photos below. 

Registration for Nashville Public Library's 7th Annual LEGO Competition is now open! 

December 10th is Human Rights Day and the library has the information to help you answer "What is that?"

Not enough poultry in your life? Then you need POYO!!!

Looking for a place to hang out and have fun with your friends or family?  Read, learn, and play during International Games Day @ your library on Saturday, November 19th.

Happy Artober! Let's celebrate with a book about food math that is so cool, even a nonmath person (like me) will love it!

The educational system in Nashville has changed quite a bit over the years, but the core subjects have always remained at the forefront of teaching. But with a few changes, would you have excelled if you had been in school about 100 years ago?

Edie has lost everything dear to her since being dragged into the immortal game. Now, she is more determined than ever change the past to prevent the future that she has experienced.

Art and music production camps, daily 3D design and robotics, and a whole lot of what Studio NPL calls HOMAGO: Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out.

26% of Nashville Public Library visitors do not have internet access at home. Close to 50% use the Library’s internet when they come to our buildings. Without basic internet service at home, people are unable to apply for jobs, complete online homework assignments, or look up needed services.*

While students may be breathlessly awaiting the end of the school year and the start of summer vacation, parents may feel a bit differently. Namely, they may wondering what are they going to do with those kids all day now that school’s out for summer.  Not to worry, Nashville Public Library is here to help! Summer is a busy time for us: we have stuff going on all summer long, for you and the kids. Read on to learn about some of the many things NPL has in store for the summer.

We've all seen some of the amazing puppet shows that Wishing Chair Productions has put on, and therefore, we've seen the diverse collection of puppets that they have. But there is one set of puppets that is no longer performed with but still represents the uniqueness of their collection - a very old set of Punch & Judy puppets. In honor of the Nashville International Puppet Festival coming up in June, this set of archaic dolls will be on display in Non-Fiction for your viewing pleasure.

Bright Lights, Dark Nights is a modern tale of first love between star-crossed teen lovers; Walter, the comic book nerd, who loves the Wu-Tang Clan and film noir and Naomi, the athlete, who just so happens to be the sister of Walter’s best friend.

Happy Poetry Month! If you're not a big poetry fan, you need to check out Mary Oliver's new book because she'll convert you.

I transferred to the Archives a month ago and I've been trying to learn all that I can about the Archive's collections. One of the coolest collections I recently stumbled upon is the small collection we have for the Nashville College for Young Ladies. In honor of Women's History Month, what better topic to discuss than women's education?

Imagine being a single mother to thirteen girls - all before you turn 21! Not many people would choose that life, but Katie did.

This month's post is about the holiday season and some of the literary treats that accompany it, such as the classic Christmas tale A Christmas Carol.  It also includes instructions on creating ornaments from recycled Christmas Carols!

Whether you be a Grinch or a Who, tis’ the season to cozy up with a warm blanket, long book and a cup of hot tea.  In keeping with the holiday spirit, we’ve compiled a list of Young Adult books to keep you company as the nights get colder. Sing to the tune of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is a film about the history of the Black Panther Party containing rare archival footage and interviews with the people who were a part of it, including members Kathleen Cleaver, Emory Douglas, Ericka Huggins, and Jamal Joseph. 

An original author, creating a fictitious author writing what amounts to fan fiction, that was then borrowed by another fictitious character for more fan fiction, and then back to the original author who took the fictitious author's character and wrote her own fan fiction? What's not to love about that?

We need diverse books! I’m sure you’ve heard this phrase or seen the hashtag on twitter in the past year. Per statistics compiled by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center, only 36 out of 3,500 children and young adult books published in 2014 were written by Latino authors.

Minecraft, a computer game where everything is made of blocks, is sweeping the nation. Everywhere you look you can find children playing the game, reading the books, or begging adults to buy them Minecraft merchandise at the store. There are many benefits to playing the game, and they can all be summed up in five letters – STEAM.

 A Southern family dynasty romance? I’m so in. I have a real soft spot for Southern literature and family sagas, so to put those together was very exciting.

Summer is winding down, the days are getting shorter, and the first day of school is just around the corner. Shake off your back to school blues and go on an end-of-summer vacation with a hot YA Road Trip title. Before hitting the open road, don’t forget to fill up the gas tank, pack some snacks, and create the perfect summer playlist.

In anticipation of the release of the new Harper Lee title, Go set a watchman, you may want to visit the classic, the title by which all American modern fiction is measured, To Kill a Mockingbird. The new title was written before Mockingbird, remained unpublished and is a sequel to Mockingbird, telling the tale of the adult Jean Louise Finch Scout.

I came across Scowler while at the library. I did not check it out at that point, because while it piqued my interest, I am always somewhat hesitant to pick up teen novels. Many teen novels that I have read have diverse plots, and are well written. However, I would quickly discover that a major part of the books’ focus are on the main characters’ love lives— a love triangle usually ensues. I like romance in small doses. When I realized this book was a Horror/Suspense novel, I quickly ran to check it out from the library.

Superhero movies have dominated Hollywood for nearly a decade, but superheroes' popularity is nothing new. Characters like Batman, Captain America, and Wonder Woman have been popular for over seventy years, but many of their caped brethren have fallen through the cracks of history.

The Summer Challenge theme this year is "Every Hero Has a Story." Check out these books with antiheroes - characters who lack conventional superhero characteristics, such as courage, idealism, and morality. You may just find your next favorite read!

According to Merriam-Webster, a hero is someone who is admired for great or brave acts or fine qualities. Take a peek at these stories of bravery and outstanding achievement!

Summer is the time to be outside in the sun and lounge around. If you're looking for a good book to read, check these out. You're not likely to find them on any summer reading list you encounter this year.

Introducing Melanie, the smartest of a group of children being taught in an underground facility. They have a variety of teachers, some cold and calculating, others loving and caring like Mrs. Justineau. Mostly, they learn about literature and Greek myths. They are no tests. In fact, the children are all strapped into chairs, escorted by armed soldiers, and treated like animals.

Each April, YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) releases a list of nominated books. From the list of approximately 25 books (found in the post), teens everywhere choose their favorites. So if you want your favorite on the Teen Top Ten list, check out the nominees and cast your vote!

America's Pastime, baseball, is starting up. Picture yourself in the stadium. Smell the hot dogs and hear the crunch of peanut shells as their trampled. Now, pick up one of these books and enjoy!

Believe it or not, many movies are adapted from books. More recently, several of those movies were once Young Adult books. Here's a list of upcoming feature films that are based on Young Adult novels.

In honor of the beginning of the next series of Sherlock on Masterpiece Mystery, I went to the periodicals stacks to dig up some original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and came across something that interested me even more.